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The World Fair Exhibit at the Henry Ford Museum until September 2nd

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Designing Tomorrow: America’s World’s Fairs of the 1930s
April 27 - September 2, 2013
A look at the future from the past
Designing Tomorrow: America’s World’s Fairs of the 1930s helps explain why millions of Americans traveled to world’s fairs in the 1930s for a glimpse of the future. Explore the modernist spectacle of architecture and design in this limited-engagement exhibition at Henry Ford Museum. The artifacts are drawn from the featured expositions: Chicago, IL—A Century of Progress International Exposition (1933–34); San Diego, CA—California Pacific International Exposition (1935-36); Dallas, TX—Texas Centennial Exposition (1936); Cleveland, OH—Great Lakes Exposition (1936-37); San Francisco, CA—Golden Gate International Exposition (1939-40); and New York, NY—New York World's Fair (1939-40).

Check out this you tube video of Electro a robot featured at the world fairs who smoked cigarettes...

Also not to be missed are the artifacts pertaining to the world fairs from the Henry Ford estate. A tour guide will be waiting at the end of the exhibit and if you are interested will show you slides from this collection and will tell you informative and funny stories pertaining to each artifact.

         Designing Tomorrow: America’s World’s Fairs of the 1930s was organized by the National Building Museum, Washington, D.C.

This exhibition has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities*: Because democracy demands wisdom; and the National Endowment for the Arts.
*Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this exhibition do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Exhibit is free with Museum admission.

MEMBERS free of charge;
NON-MEMBER SENIORS age 62 & up, $15
NON-MEMBER ADULTS age 13-61, $17
NON-MEMBER YOUTH age 5-12, $12.50
CHILDREN 4 & under are free.

Parking is $5 per vehicle.
what to bring, what to wear
The exhibits of the Henry Ford Museum are spread across several acres; all indoors. Comfortable clothing and comfortable walking shoes are recommended. Wheelchairs and electric scooters are available to rent for a fee at the IMAX and Clock tower entrances. Electric scooter supplies are limited, please arrive early if you plan to rent one. You are welcome to bring your own wheelchairs, electric scooters and children's strollers-- however, upright electric scooters (Segways) are not allowed on premises.

Photography, food and drink are strictly prohibited in the exhibit area.
The Henry Ford is located in Dearborn, Michigan on the corner of Village Road and Oakwood Boulevard, just west of the Southfield Freeway (M-39) and south of Michigan Avenue (US-12).
The Henry Ford
20900 Oakwood Blvd.
Dearborn, MI 48124-5029